Disclosures Regarding My Portfolios: Attributing the Contributions of Others

‘Personal’ Achievement?

October 8, 2018 was an extremely memorable night for Drew Brees at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. Under the intense scrutiny of Monday Night Football, the quarterback of the New Orleans Saints became the leading passer in the history of the National Football League. (For those not familiar with this sport, you can think of his 72,103-yard milestone as a lifetime-achievement accomplishment of ultramarathon’ic proportions.) The narrative on Brees’ contributions to ‘the game’ are anything but complete. In fact, the longer he plays, the more impressive this milestone becomes, as he continues to place distance between himself and every other NFL QB.

Of course the record books, and Brees’ inevitable induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, will all position this as an individual-achievement award. Whenever given the opportunity to reflect upon seemingly personal achievements such as the all-time passing leader, Brees is quick to acknowledge those who have enabled him to be so stunningly successful in such a high-profile, high-pressure role – from family and friends, to teammates, coaches, and more.

As I wrote about another NFL quarterback in a recent post, like Tom Brady, Brees remains a student-of-the-game. He is also known for his off-the-field work ethic that he practices with the utmost intensity in preparing for those moments when he takes the main stage along with his team. Therefore, when someone like Brees shares achievements with those around him, it’s clearly an act that is sincerely authentic.

Full Disclosure

At the very least, self-curating and sharing in public some collection of your work has more than the potential to come across as an act of blatant self-indulgence – and, of course, to some degree it is! At the very worst, however, is the potential for such an effort to come across as a purely individual contribution. Because contribution matters so much to me personally, I wanted to ensure that any portfolio I self-curate includes appropriate disclosures; disclosures that acknowledge the importance of collaboration, opportunity, support, and so on, from my family, friends and acquaintances, peers and co-workers, employers, customers and partners, sponsors, and more. In other words, and though in a very different context, like Brees I want to ensure that what comes across as ‘My Portfolio’ rightly acknowledges that this too is a team sport.

In the interests of generic disclosures then, the following is an attempt to ensure the efforts of others are known explicitly:

  • Articles, book chapters and posters – Based on authorships, affiliations and acknowledgements, portfolio artifacts such as articles, book chapters and posters make explicit collaborators, enablers and supporters/influencers, respectively. In this case, there’s almost no need for further disclosure.
  • Blog posts – Less formal than the written and oral forms of communication already alluded to above and below, it’s through the words themselves and/or hyperlinks introduced that the contributions of others are gratefully and willingly acknowledged. Fortunately, it is common practice for page-ranking algorithms to take into account the words and metadata that collectively comprise blog posts, and appropriately afford Web pages stronger rankings based upon these and other metrics.
  • Presentations – My intention here is to employ Presentations as a disclosure category for talks, webinars, workshops, courses, etc. – i.e., all kinds of oral communications that may or may not be recorded. With respect to this category, my experience is ‘varied’ – e.g., in not always allowing for full disclosure regarding collaborators, though less so regarding affiliations. Therefore, to make collaborators as well as supporters/influencers explicit, contribution attributions are typically included in the materials I’ve shared (e.g., the slides corresponding to my GTC17 presentation) and/or through the words I’ve spoken. Kudos are also warranted for the organizations I’ve represented in some of these cases as well, as it has been a byproduct of this representation that numerous opportunities have fallen into my lap – though often owing to a sponsorship fee, to be completely frank. Finally, sponsoring organizations are also deserving of recognition, as it is often their mandate (e.g., a lead-generation marketing program that requires a webinar, a call for papers/proposals) that inspires what ultimately manifests itself as some artifact in one of my portfolios; having been on the event-sponsor’s side more than a few times, I am only too well aware of the effort involved in creating the space for presentations … a contribution that cannot be ignored.

From explicit to vague, disclosures regarding contribution are clearly to barely evident. Regardless, for those portfolios shared via my personal blog (Data Science Portfolio and Cloud Computing Portfolio), suffice it to say that there were always others involved. I’ve done my best to make those contributions clear, however I’m sure that unintentional omissions, errors and/or (mis)representations exist. Given that these portfolios are intentionally positioned and executed as works-in-progress, I look forward to addressing matters as they arise.

An Eight Pack of Leadership Traits

I recently came across an article by Hank Marquis on effective leadership traits for those in IT

Marquis distills the following eight pack of traits:
  1. Leadership means focusing on the needs of others, not yourself
  2. Leadership comes from your actions, not your title
  3. Leadership makes you accountable, even if it’s not your fault
  4. Leadership is not a 9-to-5 activity
  5. Leadership takes trust from your followers
  6. Leaders get their best ideas from their team
  7. Leadership thrives on diversity
  8. Leadership comes from continuous communication
Marquis elaborates on each of these traits in the article.
And as two final nuggets to further whet your appetite, consider the following two quotes:

Effective leaders build a trusted team and then follow the team’s advice.

… always give the credit to the team. The leader’s credit comes only by crediting the team he or she leads.

Injury Time: Remembrance of Things Just Passed …

What happened?

I strained my lower back. Badly. It was the result of two careless acts: 
  1. Lifting a heavy prop awkwardly at our annual Mardi Gras event. I felt a twinge of pain, and suspect that this predisposed my back towards injury.
  2. Attempting to leave a leg-press machine before completely releasing the 220 lbs of weight that I, back included, was still supporting. 
The pivotal incident (involving the leg-press machine) happened last Wednesday at the University’s athletic complex. Of course, I finished my hamstring curls and rowed for 20 minutes before calling it a day. Doh! 
And yes, I knew then that I was in deep trouble. 
Contrary to my spouse’s advice, I hauled my sorry self off to the University the next day, because I had things that must be done. Doh! With a notable, curvaceous list (upwards to the left), and walking speed 10-20% my normal, I can honestly state that I got a deeper appreciation of what it means to be differently abled. People rushing past me, icy walkways, plus doors stiff to open, were all-of-a-sudden on my radar. 
I barely made it through that Thursday.
I started my formal convalescence (aka. sensible acknowledgement of my predicament) on Friday morning. 

What did I do?
I convalesced. At this point, I had no choice! I took muscle relaxant and installed myself upon a heating pad. Save for attending to primal bodily functions, and attempting to do a few exercises I learned in physio that last time I strained my lower back, I remained in a sub-horizontal state through the entire weekend. I had to pass on a friend’s birthday party and a ski day 😦  
But, I:

I fretted. About work – not being there, work piling up, etc. And about my exercise routine – that picked me up, and then knocked me down! I communed with my family – when they weren’t making up for my shortfalls – and with our pets (three cats and an obnoxiously vocal husky).


What did I learn?
How good people are to me. From walking the dog to driving Miss Daisy (our teenage princess to/from dance/work/friends/etc.) to countless other things I normally do, my family filled the gaps and still had some energy left over for me in my supine state. When I did hobble into the office, I received all kinds of moral and physical support from my co-workers.
In addition to valuing my health, which I’ve been consistently better at for about the past seven months, I need to be careful – especially during acts of weekend heroism (aka. attempts at being handy) and/or exercise (technique and form do matter – ouch!).
I need to allocate more time for reading. All kinds of reading. Because I really don’t watch TV, except for NFL football, there’s nothing I can do there. Reducing the amount of time I spend handling email is about the only place I believe I can claw back from. In the 4-Hour Work Week, Timothy Ferriss presents some provocative suggestions on this front; I’d better re-read that! 
The BlackBerry is a wonderfully powerful platform that suits me when I am highly mobile, but also when I’m highly immobile – like flat on my back, literally! It’s also the only device my back can actually handle me moving around with at the moment – my laptop in an over-the-shoulder case is a non-starter for me in my current condition.

Why did I share this?
So that I have something to refer back to (sorry), when I’m getting careless!