Pencasting with a Wacom tablet: Time to revisit this option

Around the start of the Fall term in September 2014, I found myself in a bit of a bind: My level of frustration with Livescribe pencasting had peaked, and was I desperately seeking alternatives. To be clear, it was changes to the Livescribe platform that were the source of this frustration, rather than pencasting as a means for visual communication. In fact, if anything, a positive aspect of the Livescribe experience was that I was indeed SOLD on pencasting as an extremely effective means for communicating visually – an approach that delivered significant value in instructional settings such as the large classes I was teaching at the university level.

In an attempt to make use of an alternative to the Livescribe platform then, I discovered and acquired a small Wacom tablet. Whereas I rapidly became proficient in use of the Livescribe Echo smartpen, because it was truly like making use of a regular pen, my own learning curve with the Wacom solution was considerably steeper.

To be concrete, you can view on Youtube a relatively early attempt. As one viewer commented:

Probably should practice the lecture. Too many pauses um er ah.

Honestly, that was more a reflection of my grasp of the Wacom platform than my expertise with the content I was attempting to convey through this real-time screen capture. In other words, my comfort level with this technology was so low that I was distracted by it. Given that many, many thousands of visual (art) professionals make use of this or similar solutions from Wacom, I’m more that willing to admit that this one was ‘on me’ – I wasn’t ‘a natural’.

With the Wacom solution, you need to train your eyes to be fixed on your screen, while your hand writes/draws/etc. on the tablet. Not exactly known for my hand-eye coordination in general, it’s evident that I struggled with this technology. As I look at the results some four years later, I’m not quite as dismayed as I expected to be. My penmanship isn’t all that bad – even though I still find writing and drawing with this tablet to be a taxing exercise in humility. In hindsight, I’m also fairly pleased with the Wacom tablet’s ability to permit use of colour, as well as lines of different thicknesses. This flexibility, completely out of scope in the solution from Livescribe, introduces a whole next level of prospects for visual communication.

Knowing that others have mastered the Wacom platform, and having some personal indication of its potential to produce useful results, I’m left with the idea of giving this approach another try – soon. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Synthetic Life and Evolution of Earth’s Second Atmosphere

I have the pleasure of teaching the science of weather and climate to non-scientists again this Fall/Winter session at Toronto’s York University. In the Fall 2011 Term, time was spent discussing the origin and evolution of Earth’s atmosphere. What follows is a post I just shared with the class via Moodle (our LMS):
Photosynthesizing anaerobic lifeforms in Earth’s oceans were likely responsible for systematically enriching Earth’s atmosphere with respect to O2. Through chemical reactions in Earth’s atmosphere, O3 and the O3 layer were systematically derived from this same source of O2. The O3 layer’s ability to minimize the impact of harmful UV radiation, in tandem with the ascent of [O2] to current values of about 21% by volume, were and remain crucial to life as we experience it today.

In tracing the evolution of Earth’s second atmosphere from a composition based on volcanic outgassing to its present state, the role of life was absolutely critical.

On my drive home tonight after today’s lecture, I happened upon a broadcast regarding synthetic life on CBC Radio‘s Ideas. Based upon annotated excerpts from a Craig Venter lecture, this broadcast is well worth the listen in and of itself. And although I’m no life scientist, I can’t help but predict that Venter’s work will ultimately lead to refinements, if not a complete rewrite, of life’s role in the evolution of Earth’s second atmosphere.
If you have any thoughts on this prediction, please feel free to share them here via a comment.