How I Ended Up in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

How I Ended Up in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

Lately, I’ve been disclosing the various biases I bring to practicing and enabling Data Science. Motivated by my decision to (finally) self-curate an online, multimedia portfolio, I felt such biases to be material in providing the context that frames this effort. Elsewhere, I’ve shared my inherently scientific bias. In this post, I want to provide additional details. These details I’ve been able to extract verbatim from a blog post I wrote for Bright Computing in January 2015; once I’d settled on geophysics (see below), I aspired to be a seismologist … but, as you’ll soon find out, things didn’t pan out quite the way I’d expected:

I always wanted to be a seismologist.

Scratch that: I always wanted to be an astronaut. How could I help it? I grew up in suburban London (UK, not Ontario) watching James Burke cover the Apollo missions. (Guess I’m also revealing my age here!)

Although I never gave my childhood dream of becoming an astronaut more than a fleeting consideration, I did pursue a career in science.

As my high-school education drew to a close, I had my choices narrowed down to being an astronomer, geophysicist or a nuclear physicist. In grade 12 at Laurier Collegiate in Scarboro (Ontario, not UK … or elsewhere), I took an optional physics course that introduced me to astronomy and nuclear physics. And although I was taken by both subjects, and influenced by wonderful teachers, I dismissed both of these as areas of focus in university. As I recall, I had concerns that I wouldn’t be employable if I had a degree in astronomy, and I wasn’t ready to confront the ethical/moral/etc. dilemmas I expected would accompany a choice of nuclear physics. Go figure!

And so it was to geophysics I was drawn, again influenced significantly by courses in physical geography taught by a wonderful teacher at this same high school. My desire to be a seismologist persisted throughout my undergraduate degree at Montreal’s McGill Universitywhere I ultimately graduated with a B.Sc. in solid Earth geophysics. Armed with my McGill degree, I was in a position to make seismology a point of focus.

But I didn’t. Instead, at Toronto’s York University, I applied Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) to Earth’s deep interior – mostly Earth’s fluid outer core. Nothing superficial here (literally), as the core only begins some 3,000 km below where we stand on the surface!

Full disclosure: In graduate school, the emphasis was GFD. However, seismology crept in from time to time. For example, I made use of results from deep-Earth seismology in estimating the viscosity of Earth’s fluid outer core. Since this is such a deeply remote region of our planet, geophysicists need to content themselves with observations accessible via seismic and other methods.

From making use of Apache Spark to improve the performance of seismic processing (search for “Reverse-Time Seismic Migration” or “RTM” in my Portfolio), to the analysis of ‘seismic data’ extracted from Twitter (search for “Twitter”in my Portfolio), seismology has taken center stage in a number of my projects as a practitioner of Data Science. However, so has the geophysical fluid dynamics of Earth’s mantle and outer core. Clearly, you can have your geeky cake and eat it too!

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